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PostPosted: Mon Sep 18, 2017 11:17 am 
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Simulating exciting ideas at Google Weekend

Google Startup Weekend for students at the National Institute of Technology-Tiruchi (NIT-T) witnesed a congregation of designers, coders, and business developers in them raring to don the mantle of entrepreneurs.

For 54 hours, 12 teams kept improvising their ideas under the guidance of Vikas Malpani, Co-Founder of Commonfloor; Muthu Ramalingam, CEO of Hello Leads; and Srinivas Vuppala, Head ISV and Cloud at Sonata Software.

The three-day event since Friday was marked by emergence of ideas like ‘Retila Technologies’ aimed at solving communication problems with real time translation; ‘Techie Helpline’ looking to help budding companies find technical talent; and ‘Lifarm’, an indoor farming solution based on hydroponics.

The winning team for the event named ‘Cocoon’ proposed an attachable shade device focused at the cyclists in the NITT campus.

The winners and participants received valuable insight about incubation opportunities from the CEDI-Sonata Entrepreneurship Fund.

Fruitful interaction

The participants felt that the event was their most productive weekend in college and that they felt energised to face the challenges of entrepreneurship.

On Saturday, the students spent substantial time getting guidance from Dayal Nathan, CEO at energyly.com; Arul Murugan, CEO at Snack experts; Dorai Thodla , Founder at i-Morph; Natasha Lorraine, Co-Founder at The Words Edge; Sunil Varghese, Master Mind at Hevea; Sayeed Ahmed, Sales Lead at KissFlow; and Dinesh Varadaharajan, Vice-President at Orangescape.

The day was spent on customer validation, prototype development, business modelling, and mentor interactions, driving home the corollary between widened perspective of ideas and business repurcussions.

http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp ... 706669.ece


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 17, 2017 6:31 pm 
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 16, 2017 10:29 pm 
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 16, 2017 8:36 pm 
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 15, 2017 11:19 pm 
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Trichy is gearing up for an entirely New and Elegant Shopping Festival " TRICHY UTSAV 2017" from Sep 15th to 17th


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Proudly made in India

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Sheela Lunkad, founder, Design Create. | Photo Credit: B. Velankanni Raj

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Our handicrafts industry needs both patronage and innovation to thrive, says Design Create founder Sheela Lunkad

A handicraft fair usually draws more of the browser than serious shopper these days.

As we look through stalls showcasing hundreds of novelties and utilities made out of wood, metal, stone and cloth, our thoughts rarely linger on the skillful hands that would have fashioned such items of beauty.


Visitors to handicraft fairs are often more busy comparing prices rather than examining the craftsmanship of the items on display.

Perhaps that is why Indian handicrafts are more visible and appreciated outside the country.

Despite it being fragmented and unorganised, the Indian handicraft industry employs 7 million regional artisans and has more than 67,000 exporters engaged in promoting its wares in domestic and foreign markets.

“In a way I feel no traditional craft is really dying. What’s missing is market linkage, design interpretation and communication with people who really want to buy,” says Sheela Lunkad, founder, Direct Create, an online community of artists, artisans, makers, buyers and designers who are involved in the promotion of exclusive handmade creations.

Direct Create is participating in the ongoing ‘Trichy Utsav 2017 — Celebrating Handmade’ exhibition-cum-sale at Hotel Sangam this week on the invitation of Aura women’s group.

Sheela Lunkad was speaking to The Hindu MetroPlus on the sidelines of a meeting organised by the local chapter of Young Indians (affiliated to Confederation of Indian Industry) and MAM School of Architecture on contemporary art and sustainable planning for the heritage city of Srirangam on Thursday.


Going digital

With a slogan that says ‘Buy from people, not brands,’ Lunkad’s initiative has created an online platform for remotely located artisans to take advantage of the emerging demand for furnishings and design elements that are culturally significant and locally made.

The Aura shopping festival is featuring over 30 people representing traditional handicrafts who have come to Tiruchi for the first time.

Handicraft makers can advertise their wares through a mobile phone application floated by Design Create, which lets buyers approach them directly. “The moment you create something and sow a seed with a credible order, you will find the craft community revived,” Lunkad says.

Some 500 makers are already registered with Direct Create, and its database of 2000 craftspersons is growing.

Personal touch

But Lunkad, a trained architect who curated a living exhibition for the 2002 Smithsonian Folk Life Festival, in Washington, DC and managed the construction and interiors of Fabindia’s 8,000 sq ft flagship store in the Greater Kailash in New Delhi before striking out on her own into eco-friendly tourism and product design, says that not everything that is handmade can be marketed.

“We have to be able invest time and lots of energy into creating a handicraft industry that is not reduced to making just tacky souvenirs,” she says. “We also have to look at good design. The story of the craftsman is missing from the handicraft, which is why this sector is losing patronage in India.”

But handicrafts also need a steady generational transferring of skills, which has slowed, or in some cases, completely disappeared in India’s artisanal communities. “Not being able to cultivate the artistic capability of human beings and putting them into a mechanised employment is a disaster for humanity,” says Lunkad. “The artist needs to take pride in his craft, earn a decent living and feel that he has utilised his creative energy. That is something that we as citizens and groups of people can make possible easily.”



source: http://www.thehindu.com/society/history-and-culture/handicraft-promotion-sheela-lunkad/article19691997.ece

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courtesy: Direct Create Facebook


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 11, 2017 1:30 pm 
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 10, 2017 9:33 am 
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 09, 2017 9:54 am 
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 09, 2017 6:54 am 
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Festember spirit on

Reflecting social responsibility dimension of Festember, the annual festival in September, NIT-T students conducted PAGES, a book collection drive, at Gnaneshwara Nursery and Primary School, K. K. Nagar, on Thursday.

A total of 150 books collected from schools and colleges were donated to the school library.

Four hundred students took part in storytelling, word games, and origami competitions meant to provide a good learning experience for the students. An interactive session encouraged the students to discover the joy of reading.

In the first phase, a book collection drive was conducted to collect old books, and in the second phase, a library was set up in the school to enable the students gain wide knowledge.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 06, 2017 9:55 am 
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People gathered on the banks of River Cauvery at Trichy to support Rally For Rivers.
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