Trichyportal.com

Exclusive Forum on Trichy. Contact Info : trichyportal@gmail.com
It is currently Wed Feb 21, 2018 1:09 am


All times are UTC + 5:30 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 1255 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 ... 126  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: Trichy bits !!!
PostPosted: Fri Jun 02, 2017 11:39 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Oct 29, 2015 11:18 am
Posts: 4792
Has thanked: 88 times
Been thanked: 138 times
Lion Dates------A look at how a bicycle-driven business became a Rs. 300 crore company

Quote:
In the holy month of Ramzan, the iftar meals begin with the date. Dates are associated closely with Islam because the fruit finds mention in the Holy Quran over 20 times.

But for P Ponnudurai, managing director of Lion Dates Impex, India’s largest date processing and trading company, the pulpy fruit from West Asia is a nutritious gift from Arabia that can be enjoyed by anyone.

Humble beginnings

The musky fragrance of date pulp greets visitors to the corporate office in Tiruchi. Delivery vehicles and workers mill around in a hive of activity on the three-acre packing complex. What started as a bicycle-driven business in 1978 has now become a company worth over Rs. 300 crores.

“I never really plan for the future,” says Ponnudurai. “I just trust my instincts and make sure to personally do all the field work.”

The son of a landless farmer from Tiruchi who later went to Sri Lanka, Ponnudurai started working in grocery stores at the age of 10. He continued to work as a provision store assistant when his family was sent back from Sri Lanka in 1974.

In 1978, Ponnudurai decided to fulfill his dream of setting up a grocery, with a capital of Rs. 1,000. “I ran up losses of over Rs. 4,000, so I took a job at the Collectorate to settle all my outstanding dues,” he says.

To supplement his salary of Rs. 800, he used to sell packets of dishwashing soap powder on his bicycle. It was during one such sales trip that he noticed how dates were being sold in a big store. Stored in gunny bags and looking rather unappetising, Arabian dates were not the most popular items on sale in Indian shops in those days. “I offered to clean and repack the dates in one shop, and this led to other shops requesting me to do the same,” recalls Ponnudurai.

Ponnudurai realised that his idea of manually stoning (deseeding) the dates and repacking them in small square blocks (with a metal die donated by a printing press) could be his next big break.

Quickly creating his brand symbol (a picture of the iconic lion ‘borrowed’ from a political party’s symbol), Ponnudurai started exploring markets outside Tiruchi.

For a few years, he dealt with suppliers in Mumbai, and from 1993, decided to tap the Arabian market directly. “I used to be terrified of dealing with the Mumbai suppliers, because I knew only Tamil,” says Ponnudurai. “Once, I got scolded for my lack of language skills, and felt very bad. So the first thing I did after returning to Tiruchi, was to engage a teacher to learn spoken English,” he says.

He was perhaps the first to introduce premium black dates from Oman and Jordan in India.

“We want consumers of all economic backgrounds to enjoy this nutritious fruit.” The company today gets dates from Tunisia, Jordan, Saudi Arabia and United Arab Emirates.

Technology rules

At the packing complex, each date variety (ranging from Iraq’s Al Zahidi to Jordan’s Mejdool ) gets its own floor. Women workers form the majority of the 1200-strong employee count.

“We find women are better at analysing the quality of the dates,” says Anitha Ponnudurai, the founder’s eldest daughter and a director in the company. Lion Dates has its own factory in Muscat, Oman, where the produce of 80-90 Omani farms is procured and shipped to Tuticorin harbour.

“It takes nearly six months for the fruit to get ready for us,” says Anitha. “A date palm can produce up to five bunches of 10 kilos each. We take 20-25 acres of the farm (the entire farm) for our needs.”

On average, the company sources 2,000 tonnes of black dates from Oman and 6,000 tonnes from Iraq (through a middleman in Dubai). It has been certified as Saudi Arabia’s largest date importer.


Once in India, the stock is shifted to a custom-built cold storage plant in the Tiruchi suburb of Karumandapam. “The first step is usually the manual deseeding and packing in blocks of the dates. We employ women in four villages -- Kacha Mangalm, Sarkarpalayam, Pettavaithaalai and Jeeyarpuram for this process,” says Anitha.

The final packing is done with the help of machines. “Vacuum sealing and gas flushing are the best ways to preserve dates in our climate. We are trying to reduce the manual handling of the fruit to keep it as clean as possible,” says Anitha.

Sweet success

In an adjacent building, date syrup is getting ready in huge metal vats that can process up to 100 kilos of dates in one go. Whole dates are boiled in water to a mushy pulp at 80 degrees Celsius, mechanically deseeded and then steamed to extract a thick decoction that is then bottled.

The syrup can be mixed in lukewarm milk or be eaten on its own. At least 120 litres of syrup are manufactured per month at this plant. “Our date jam is one of our most popular add-on products,” says G Rajkumar, head, Sales and Marketing, and Anitha’s spouse.

The founder’s family is involved in all things dates; Ponnudurai’s wife Maheshwari has been in charge of the accounts since the company’s inception while daughter Abhinaya takes care of the Chennai office.

Besides date jam and halwa, the Lion brand encompasses honey, oats, tamarind concentrate, squashes and dried fruit mixes.

“Today, we have 2,000 direct and 5,000 indirect distributors for our products. Some of these people are friends from my days as a dishwashing soap powder salesman,” says Ponnudurai.




source: http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-features/tp-metroplus/a-date-with-ramzan/article18703796.ece


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on Google+Report this post
Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Trichy bits !!!
PostPosted: Mon May 29, 2017 7:24 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2010 4:55 pm
Posts: 4826
Has thanked: 41 times
Been thanked: 114 times
How many of us knows that ranganathan street, in T.Nagar Chennai got it's name??? hardly less than 0.1%???

Yes this street is named after our Trichy, Srirangam Lord renganathan. Wondering!!! but 100% true news...

Breif history;

Intially this renganathan street was called as renganathaswamy iyengar street, those days in madras presidency streets or areas name were named after the 1st resident person of that area irrespective of their's caste, religion.

It was Mr. Tupil rangaswamy iyengar a retired civil servant from Madras presidency who built his house in this area in 1920s, when authorities requested to rename this street as tupil rangaswamy iyengar street, he refused and humbly requested to name by his almighty god Srirangam renganathan. And that came the name renganthan street, @ chennai.

Srirangam, renganthan ruling the chennai streets.


http://www.indianmirror.com/…/india…/Ranganathan-Street.html


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on Google+Report this post
Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Trichy bits !!!
PostPosted: Sat May 27, 2017 4:00 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Oct 29, 2015 11:18 am
Posts: 4792
Has thanked: 88 times
Been thanked: 138 times
Image



source: IE


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on Google+Report this post
Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Trichy bits !!!
PostPosted: Mon May 22, 2017 7:58 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2010 4:55 pm
Posts: 4826
Has thanked: 41 times
Been thanked: 114 times
Brief history about Trichy

Image

Image

Image


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on Google+Report this post
Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Trichy bits !!!
PostPosted: Thu May 18, 2017 7:49 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2010 4:55 pm
Posts: 4826
Has thanked: 41 times
Been thanked: 114 times
Aravindh wrote:
Kingdom of Sound..!!
***************************
The archive of All India Radio Tiruchirappalli is a treasure trove of sound clips from 1930s to the present.
**********************************************************
There’s no better place to see the march of recording technology than the archive room of All India Radio Tiruchirappalli.
Tucked away in a corner of the ground floor of the vast AIR building, the archive is a treasure trove of sound clips from 1930s to the present.

Keeping pace with the conversion from analogue to digital format, the archives too are gradually getting transferred from magnetic tapes to computerised sound clips. A. Rajaram, Library Information Assistant, has been overseeing the conversion of 1,114 magnetic tapes (of 15- and 30-minute duration) into .wma (Windows Media Audio) files.
“Each of these tapes comes with a handwritten note on the content which has to be catalogued as well,” he says, showing visitors around the room.

“So far we have managed to save 405 music recordings, 333 Tamil talks (non-musical content), 26 radio plays, and assorted folk music and feature programmes in digital format,” says Rajaram of the process that lasted over a year.
“We have 8,000 such tapes in total, so there’s still more work to be done,” he adds.

The archive room, which has to maintain a temperature of 18-20 degrees Celsius to prevent the magnetic tapes from getting damaged, is also a sort of mini-museum of sound recording technology, as it’s still possible to see long-out-of-circulation machines being kept here for the conversion work.

The magnetic tapes, manufactured exclusively for AIR stations by the Hindustan Photo Film Manufacturing Co. Ltd, Ooty, have to be first fixed on a turntable console before being converted to digital files with the help of specialist software, a time-consuming process that needs staff to be familiar with old and new technology.

“Preserving classical music recordings is the most difficult, because each sound clip has to have additional information about the ragas, talas, and even the accompanying musicians,” says Rajaram, pulling out detailed tabulated sheets.

Digitalisation has changed the role of the archive too, as archivists now have to deal with cue sheets that give the details of the recordings on a computer database, rather than physical tapes.

Among the gems in this collection are the speech made by Rajaji in Tiruchi ahead of the Vedaranyam Salt Satyagraha, and recordings by the greats of Carnatic vocal and instrumental music, from K.P. Sundarambal, Thiruvavaduthurai T. N. Rajarathnam Pillai to Sheik Chinnamoulana and Embar Raghavachariar among others.
Speeches by prominent personalities are also available here.

The station also maintains a separate library of printed material in Tamil, English and Hindi.
“What we have here is very valuable,” says Rajaram, who has been working here for the past 18 years.
“We don’t destroy any sound clip, because someone may appreciate listening to them many years later.”

All India Radio Tiruchirappalli,
AIR Tiruchirapalli archive room
A. Rajaram

Image



when radio mirchi, radio city FMs starts airing from Trichy.


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on Google+Report this post
Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Trichy bits !!!
PostPosted: Thu May 18, 2017 6:55 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jan 22, 2009 8:43 pm
Posts: 11671
Has thanked: 124 times
Been thanked: 74 times
Kingdom of Sound..!!
***************************
The archive of All India Radio Tiruchirappalli is a treasure trove of sound clips from 1930s to the present.
**********************************************************
There’s no better place to see the march of recording technology than the archive room of All India Radio Tiruchirappalli.
Tucked away in a corner of the ground floor of the vast AIR building, the archive is a treasure trove of sound clips from 1930s to the present.

Keeping pace with the conversion from analogue to digital format, the archives too are gradually getting transferred from magnetic tapes to computerised sound clips. A. Rajaram, Library Information Assistant, has been overseeing the conversion of 1,114 magnetic tapes (of 15- and 30-minute duration) into .wma (Windows Media Audio) files.
“Each of these tapes comes with a handwritten note on the content which has to be catalogued as well,” he says, showing visitors around the room.

“So far we have managed to save 405 music recordings, 333 Tamil talks (non-musical content), 26 radio plays, and assorted folk music and feature programmes in digital format,” says Rajaram of the process that lasted over a year.
“We have 8,000 such tapes in total, so there’s still more work to be done,” he adds.

The archive room, which has to maintain a temperature of 18-20 degrees Celsius to prevent the magnetic tapes from getting damaged, is also a sort of mini-museum of sound recording technology, as it’s still possible to see long-out-of-circulation machines being kept here for the conversion work.

The magnetic tapes, manufactured exclusively for AIR stations by the Hindustan Photo Film Manufacturing Co. Ltd, Ooty, have to be first fixed on a turntable console before being converted to digital files with the help of specialist software, a time-consuming process that needs staff to be familiar with old and new technology.

“Preserving classical music recordings is the most difficult, because each sound clip has to have additional information about the ragas, talas, and even the accompanying musicians,” says Rajaram, pulling out detailed tabulated sheets.

Digitalisation has changed the role of the archive too, as archivists now have to deal with cue sheets that give the details of the recordings on a computer database, rather than physical tapes.

Among the gems in this collection are the speech made by Rajaji in Tiruchi ahead of the Vedaranyam Salt Satyagraha, and recordings by the greats of Carnatic vocal and instrumental music, from K.P. Sundarambal, Thiruvavaduthurai T. N. Rajarathnam Pillai to Sheik Chinnamoulana and Embar Raghavachariar among others.
Speeches by prominent personalities are also available here.

The station also maintains a separate library of printed material in Tamil, English and Hindi.
“What we have here is very valuable,” says Rajaram, who has been working here for the past 18 years.
“We don’t destroy any sound clip, because someone may appreciate listening to them many years later.”

All India Radio Tiruchirappalli,
AIR Tiruchirapalli archive room
A. Rajaram

Image


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on Google+Report this post
Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Trichy bits !!!
PostPosted: Wed May 17, 2017 9:49 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Oct 29, 2015 11:18 am
Posts: 4792
Has thanked: 88 times
Been thanked: 138 times
Image



source: Dinamani


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on Google+Report this post
Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Trichy bits !!!
PostPosted: Mon May 15, 2017 10:22 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jan 22, 2009 8:43 pm
Posts: 11671
Has thanked: 124 times
Been thanked: 74 times
Image


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on Google+Report this post
Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Trichy bits !!!
PostPosted: Fri May 12, 2017 10:25 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Oct 29, 2015 11:18 am
Posts: 4792
Has thanked: 88 times
Been thanked: 138 times
Image



source: IE


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on Google+Report this post
Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Trichy bits !!!
PostPosted: Mon May 08, 2017 7:06 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jan 22, 2009 8:43 pm
Posts: 11671
Has thanked: 124 times
Been thanked: 74 times
Summer beach likely to be revived this year

Image

Tiruchi is often called as an entertainment starved city thanks to the absence of viable entertainment and leisure activities. However, the residents of the city may once again enjoy their leisure time in the evenings on the Cauvery river bed as the Tiruchi City Corporation (TCC) is contemplating the idea of reviving summer beach this year.

Christened as ‘summer beach’, the district administration with the active participation of Tiruchi Corporation was opened to the public for the first time in 2012. As part of the idea, a stretch of about a kilometre of the river bed on the Cauvery river at Mambazha Salai was cleaned and illuminated with lights in order to give a beach like environment to the people enjoy an outing in the evening.

The idea had become an instant hit with thousands of city residents visiting the ‘beach site’ with children and friends in the evenings. The people, who yearned for leisure spots, visited in large numbers to enjoy cool breeze in the evenings and to watch the cultural programmes arranged by the district administration.

Utilising the opportunity, a number of hawkers had also cashed in by setting up of movable eateries. Motivated by the success, the authorities also opened up summer beach in 2013 and 2014. However, summer beach did not become a reality in 2015 and 2016, causing disappointment to the people.

A senior official of Tiruchi Corporation told The Hindu that it had received a number of representations for setting up of summer beach this year. It was not opened in 2016 due to seepage of water at the ‘beach site’. Idea had been mooted to revive the summer beach plan this year. A decision would be taken soon with the consultation of sister departments. the official added.

http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp ... 406212.ece


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on Google+Report this post
Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 1255 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 ... 126  Next

All times are UTC + 5:30 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group

Forum